About your Search

20130416
20130424
STATION
CSPAN2 7
CSPAN 6
CNBC 2
KGO (ABC) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
CNNW 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
WJLA 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
'm debra norville. >> stephanie: how about you jim? >> i'm katie couric. >> stephanie: what a news day yesterday. poor wolf blitzer. they'll have to leave it there. can you tell his accent from the surveillance video? what how would you be able to tell his accent from his surveillance video? >> were you able to see think pass port from the surveillance video. >> stephanie: the suspect was not arrested in the boston bombing, and he clearly was not darked skinned . oh other than that -- >> if he had been arrested he would have been dark skinned. >> stephanie: you remember hurricane katrina, we have done this with aisha tyler before. this is what happens when anchors have to fill time jim. oh, jack, look at all of those people, so hungry so poor so black. [ laughter ] [ wah wah ] >> stephanie: oh yes he did. it has provided all of the comedy fodder for aisha tyler and her husband, because she says literally at lunch every day she says i'm so hungry so black. [ applause ] >> stephanie: it's like a matinee performance every date their house. and there is a consolation
, and the politico median and author of "the pleat idiot's quite to comedy writing" jim mendrinos. when is it too soon to talk about politics after a tragedy or is it different in every situation. >> i think there are different aspects of politics that can be discussed like barney frank was trying to make a point thank god we have infrastructure. >> john: first responders. >> today perhaps not, but you know,-- >> john: would you agree with me that barney frank kind of crossed the line when he began relating it to the sequester and implied it would have been much worse when it was it's not proven. >> but that's not a question-- >> but newtown, you should be talking about gun control immediately. i'm sorry but yes. >> i think when you're on topic it's never too soon. if you say people with bombs pretty bad people, what can we do to prevent it, let's have that conversation. >> but that's stretching. >> it's not a question of too soon but too ignorant. does your comment have merit? after newtown that was the time to say we need to have sensible gun legislation. the only appropriate reaction to what h
are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>> welcome back to "squawk". jim is standing by at the cme in chicago. you've got the numbers. >> the numbers 352. and the claims number 368 on the continuing claims. it's about kind of where it is. the revision from last week up 2,000. so it's right kind of as expected. this was the big number. independent of last week's claims numbers over of last three weeks claims have been a big deal. they have indicated some sort of spring swoon. this is an indication how severe it is going to be. from the looks, it's not that big a deal. stock market up from that. these numbers came out as expected, which is not bad compared to two weeks ago. >> thank you for that. we've got reaction from steve liesman. are the numbers as positive as jim was portraying them? >> it's interesting, andrew. we have yet to see confirmation of that weak jobs report come up in the jobless claims. we have a speak up, some of it. now it has settled down back into that 350,000 range. you would think if it deteriorated as much as it has you would see som
afternoon. to help us through the issues of the day today ambassador jim jones, former u.s. ambassador to mexico will be here in studio with us. igor volsky, of course here as he is every tuesday from think progress and a very exciting guest today and an unusual guest, randy couture a former mma boxing star, a boxing star and an mma star and a great actor, too. extenders? >> expendables. i think he's a chump and i'm going to tell him that to his face. >> bill: he will crush you! >> you're probably right. >> bill: he will crush you. >> you're definitely right! >> bill: i have a friend who wrestled with him. >> no kidding! >> bill: he told him didn't stand a chance. flattened him out. >> if you're not familiar with randy, go online and do a google image search for him. >> bill: i'm afraid of him already. >> there are a lot of pictures of him with his shirt off. he is chilled out of rock. >> bill: i'm afraid of him already. i'm going to have cyprian come in and stand alongside of me. >> your body guard? [ laughter ] perfect. >> bill: all right. and yes indeed, they're whining about air tr
are in the nature of the bomb. >>> up next, abc's senior national correspondent jim avila, shows us just how far the blast from the bombs traveled. >> reporter: the killer bombs likely contained less than two pounds of common black powder explosive, says one of the nations leading ied experts. even leaving the characteristic white smoke. bombs designed to spread terror and death with a lethal blast of metal shrapnel. >> looks like he was out to kill and maim. >> reporter: hold it right there. here we see windows blown out here, but the buildings themselves are intact. what does that tell us about what this bomber wanted to do? >> that he did not want to take down the building. that wasn't his main target. it was to disrupt the marathon and kill people in that immediate area. >> reporter: houston says this is classic ied design, the kill zone from the blast, one to two yards. according to the accounts from the bomb's site, powerful enough to knock a runner off his feet ten yards away. and topple another man on his couch from the third floor of the building next door, 20 yards away. >> it looks li
has now been canceled. clearly there is internal debate. jim walsh is a international security analyst. he calls boston home and, jim, good morning to you. >> good morning. bill: just the sense of debate that is quite clear what you put out and what you don't, what do you believe about that? >> i think there are a couple of considerations law enforcement is looking at. you don't want to put out a photo if in some way that tells the culprit or suspect something that enables them, makes it more difficult for them to find. you don't want to tip them off if you don't have to. particularly with the fbi some sense of the richard jewell episode that still hangs over their heads. just because you have a suspect that doesn't mean they're guilty. by releasing the photo you increase the pressure, the public will look for the person. think i they want to get their you can it is in a row before they go public with it. we're seeing something we have never seen before, bill as i went on facebook, crowd sourcing which can be a powerful in a positive way and in a negative way. bill: what is crowd sourc
dollars in points from sears to use on jim's mower... hold the phone! ...and points from the grill helped pay for my dress... now you're just pulling my leg. get this, sometimes points just show up in our account. get out of town! with points from shop your way, there are more ways to save than ever at sears. oh and this bracelet... i used points to get it for free. yeah, right. and i'm married to lorenzo lamas. hola. this is how to save. this is sears. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. don't blame him. instead, rely on frontline plus. it kills adult fleas and ticks, plus flea eggs and larvae, destroying future generations. ask your vet about frontline plus. >> now from abc7 news, good morning, breaking news on a haz-mat situation in the south
, mother jones has new research. this is shocking, jim. you will be shocked. new research confirms gun rampages are rising and armed civilians don't stop them. okay. we'll get to that. all of that stuff. >> stephanie: all of the stuff we've been talking about. because people like to say they don't have any -- yes we have facts! and statistics. all right. we'll get to all of that as we continue. 17 minutes after the hour. people carbonite. why? huh? why wouldn't you have carbonite just for the peace of mind alone. these days, everything we know or have is in our computers financial documents creative stuff, your music. >> videos. >> stephanie: right? you're busy. hard to remember stuff like that to back stuff up. remember you had to keep backing up. >> on floppy disks. >> stephanie: all the time. carbonite online back-up hassle free to back up your files. it backs up files to the cloud automatically and continuously when you're connected to the internet. carbonite does all of the work for you you don't have to remember to do it again. carbonite has a back-up plan that's right for you. $
tsavraev, at the request of the russian government. cnn's national political correspondent jim acosta joins us from washington now with what's going on. a lot of frustration, a lot of what ifs, could if this boston magnificent y massacre been prevented? those are the questions that will be brought forward today. >> that's right, wolf. it will be playing out on capitol hill. the senate intelligence committee has set a hearing for 2:30 this afternoon with fbi officials, they will be the lead briefers at this hearing. i'm told from a source of that committee. lawmakers want to find out if federal investigators somehow failed to see big red flags coming from tamerlan tsavraev. as lawmakers are praising authorities for the quick work in the boston bombing case, members of congress are still calling for hearings, into the fbi's handling of dead suspect tamerlan tsavraev, who traveled back to a dangerous region of russia, just last year. >> what did he do, when he went back for six months? sit in his aunt and uncle's home for six months or doing something else? and when he came back to this countr
durbin of illinois. >> suarez: and we sit down with the head of the world bank, jim yong kim, about his new push to tackle extreme poverty around the globe. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion
and jim cramer. >> good morning, jim. >> lots to talk about. we account talk about boston and the impact on the market. i would love to hear your view on the psychology there, but also coca cola there. goldman sachs, j&j, we had good numbers. >> coca-cola doesn't have to say anything positive and people absolutely lap it up as they've done for all of the consumer products company and everies single one whereas, goldman sachs they just put a single boilerplate line about what everybody knows which is the macro environment and you're supposed to throw the stock out. i think that is a mistake, and i think the book value is for real. j & j is blessed. he's making it better. j & j and coca-cola, andrew, after boston, hey, you what? i'm take them. it's after boston. boston signifies the psychological terror that people feel when they buy anything other than what's in the supermarket. >> we were talking, i think in the 6:00 hour about sort of is this going to be a major psychological shift that people have come out and says not only a huge tragedy, but it will change the way people think about
asked. i do have one nature requests. yesterday we had a briefing by jim clapper on the intelligence budget going forward and produced a chart, which basically showed the ongoing sequester budget and other i would ask if you could check within perhaps, it is chart number 11 in his presentation. give us a similar visual breakdown of what your budget looks like, including as we now know the sequester on an ongoing basis. if we don't do anything about it, what does it do? i found this information yesterday to be very important because it shows real cuts. not cuts to grow, the real teeming nations of the funds available and it would be helpful to the committee to see that data as the books over the next 10 years, you look at the direct is chart and you'll see what i'm saying. >> we will, senator. thank you. >> one other quick comment and i'm sure you fellas know this as well as i do. one of the first things is deferring maintenance. but deferring maintenance isn't saving. if they cause someone has to pay in the future and i'm sure you agree. >> we do agree. >> you actually end up paying
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
unemployed during the great depression, and you had jim crow where it was legal and de facto segregation. you didn't find the same kind of criminality. we have spent $16 trillion since 1965 on poverty, and what we've done is we've destabilized families. that is why when a kid sees a gang banger, as you mentioned, he looks at that gang banger and thinks, hey, this is what i want to be. he doesn't have a father to say, wait a second, this is not the way to go. hit the books two good, hard hours a day. finish high school, don't have a kid before you're 20 years old and get married before you have that kid. if you do that, you will not be poor. the question we have to ask ourselves is, what policies are we doing that are giving people the incentive or disincentive to follow that formula? >> host: larry elder, a conversation between you and your mother beginning with your mother. your mother thought -- your father thought small. don't make the same mistake. that's unfair. oh, here you go again, defending him. he's not donald trump. he was a wimp, she said. >> guest: yeah. my mother -- she was in a
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
gifford has an op ed this morning. jim is a republican. what you think about what the senate did? we havehere in delaware plenty of gun laws. sure that is the case in a lot places in the country where somebody gets arrested with a gun crime, usually they are able to eliminate that. they do not prosecute for illegal guns. there are plenty of guns laws already. it is just a matter of having the prosecutors have in the nerve to enforce these laws. this is just another attempt by the federal government to disarm the people of the united states and it is not going to make any favorites. lot of this is a distraction from the economy and the fact they refuse to do anything to cut back on the sides of the government. host: are you a gun owner? caller: i do not own a gun but pretty much everyone else i know owns a gun. -- here ins castle new castle, a lot of people did not have guns. guns start leaking out towards this area. people are very open a round here about gun under ship. about gun ownership. are there any further regulations you would support on gun buying? isler: no, i just think it
in the united states senate joking or perhaps half joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spalding and the heritage foundation itself so very valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case for conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, and outspoken partisanship almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on pote sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend itself past gains -- its past gains from conservative reform. but megativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that lib
was then the news hour and now is the news hour with jim lair all the way. when you listen to the program you're going to get both sides. so we completely identify with the approach of u.s.a. today. but we live today i think all of us recognize in a much more partisan bitter maybe too strong a word but i think it fits in many ways. and some people say well it goes back to the election of 2000 and it's the war in iraq but i think it's more than that. i've seen it -- i was at cnn for 12 years, and you see it as you say in the e-mails you get from people. some people just are never are just not going to be happy. the thing that's reassuring to me though is that you get 150 e-mails from people saying you were tilting too far one way and you tilted too far the other way. and you want to be down the middle and you're going to get that kind of reaction. my question is though does it -- you know, we need to have a healthy debate about these issues but do you want people to be at each other's throats? and i think that's some of what's going on right now. and i think that's something we ought to contin
went off. former atf bomb investigator jim cavanaugh says it's obvious. >> large injuries were on the side of it, debris field to the left. some protected areas over on the right side that indicate the blast was to the one side of the trash receptacle. this was the scene of the blast. >> the fbi is considering publicly showing the pictures of the men they're looking for, and may do so later at a news conference today. >> pete, thank you very much. >>> drenching rain overnight in chicago. al? >> there are states of emergency throughout much of northern illinois into central illinois, because of the flooding they've gotten, the dan ryan expressway. it's a real mess there. chicago o'hare airport picking up over 4 inches of rain in the last 3 hours. in fact, airport reporting the terminal has actually had water on the floor. it's been flooding in there. still more heavy rain making its way through chicago today. it's going to continue to come down. we have flawed flood warnings much through missouri and illinois, and we're also looking for rainfall amounts anyway anyway to what the
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there are more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those. we hope you will take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it is important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history durling the time to -- during the time to world war ii that we intered some japanese americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. in the right of history, it was an error. so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in some of the post 9/11 environment. there are key questions we want to answer this morning. one, did the treatment rise to torture? secondly, how did it happen? what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found u.s. personnel in many instances used ininterrogation techniques on detainees that constitutional torture. military personnel conducted cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment. both c
is a conservative republican, a former democratic member of congress jim jones and this study, this group looked at the question of torture and came to some amazing conclusions. number one, they said there is no doubt, no doubt, that the united states engaged in the practice of torture under the bush administration. this is just under george bush and dick cheney, number 1. we did engage in torture. it was illegal. it was against international law. number 3, we did it even though there is no firm or persuasive evidence, reading from the report, that they produced any valuable information or any information that we could not have gotten through other means, zero evidence of anything out of that torture. and he engaging in torture, from the bi-partisan report quote, damaged the standing of our nation reducedour capacity to enact moral 7censure and increased the danger to u.s. military personnel taken captive. we did it. it was illegal, we got nothing out of it. we damaged our standing, we made our own military -- put our own military more at risk and more in danger
by retiring senator jim bunting. he won decisively in the general. when he got to the senate, he quickly founded the tea party caucus. finally, for you breakfast tea party buff, a group of which i may be the only member, of our nearly 3800 breakfasts, only two times have we had both a father and a son as guests. we hosted former representative ron paul in september 2011. the only other father/son team was mitt romney and his dad, michigan governor george romney. so much for biography and breakfast trivia. now on to mechanical manners. as always, we're on the record. please, no live blogging or tweeting, in short, no filing of any kind while the breakfast is underway. there's no embargo when the breakfast is over except that c-span has agreed to the to use video of the session for at least an hour after the breakfast ends to give those of us in the room a chance to file. if you'd like to ask a question, please, do the traditional thing and send me a subtle, nonthreatening signal, and i'll happily call. we'll start off by offering our guest the opportunity to make some opening comments. an
activated and incident management assistant jim, three preliminary damage assessment teams, and we are also standing by to assist in any other way. our eoc remains at level three, which is at increased readiness. we will continue to monitor the events over the course of the day and provide you with updates as they are relevant. i might add, mr. chairman, that many of the things i've just gone through are examples of the kinds of activities that have been supported by the committee, through fema, through the various grants that we supply, search and rescue being a good example of the kinds of things that grants have been supporting increasing our capacity for response and resilience as a nation. so that is the most recent on west, texas. with respect to boston, we are, we are investi this as an act of terror. we ae assisting. ice is part of the jttf. we have over four dozen ice agents now assigned to the boston office helping in the investigation. cdp is assisting in a number of tays immediately after the we work to close logan, the ground air for a few hours and to institute special targeti
of the other questions have been asked. mouest -- yesterday in tntitellige had a briefing by jim clapper on thedg goingforwd. he produced a chart which basically showed, started with fy 2012 and show the effects of the various -- the first sequester and the ongoing sequester, the president's budget and other things that have affected that. it was a very powerful chart. i would ask of you could check with him, perhaps, chart number 11. visual a similar breakdown of what your budget thes like, including sequester on an ongoing basis. what does it do if we don't do anything about it? filed the suit for richelieu -- i found this information to be ry important. the munitions in the amount of funds available. the hobbled to see that data over the next 10 years, building in different places. look at the chart and you'll see what i am saying. >> we will. on thisther comment will sequester and budget. know this as well as i do. one of the first things you have to do in this situation is deferred maintenance. that is not saving. a cost someone will have to pay in the future. i am sure you agree. >
to the republicans, with a primary part of voting rights and citizenship and naacp informed and in the jim crow? and did you know that most african-americans were republicans at one time? i was told that in no uncertain terms that but i think the vast majority of the public, i think you'd find a 90% of the public had no idea that republicans help to found the naacp or. so some people think it is presumptuous and i should be talking about it, well, we need to talk about it. then i messed up on the senator's name, edward brooke. it's like, i'm human. i forgot his day. i knew his name but i forgot. it wasn't like it was a part of my speech and i forgot. it was in my question and into. i forgot his name. but the point i was making that was from edward brooke was he was asking in his 90s about the rich history of the republican party in academic and and he was asked, you know, his response was, he said, well, if the democrats had this history you would hear about it nonstop and he said, the indication was it was a problem republicans didn't talk about it it is harder for me but i'm not have been ame
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)